orangethoughtbubble
When people are juggling time, they are doing something very similar to when they’re juggling finances. It is all scarcity juggling. You borrow from tomorrow, and tomorrow you have less time than you have today, and tomorrow becomes more costly. It’s a very costly loan.
Eldar Shafir, the William Stewart Tod Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs at Princeton, quoted in The New York Times (via orangethoughtbubble)
Mexican immigrants who relocate to the United States often face barriers like poorly paying jobs, crowded housing and family separation. Such obstacles – including the migration process itself – may be detrimental to the health of Mexican immigrants, especially those who have recently moved.
A study led by Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs finds that Mexican immigrants who relocate to the United States are more likely to experience declines in health within a short time period compared with other Mexicans.

Mexican immigrants who relocate to the United States often face barriers like poorly paying jobs, crowded housing and family separation. Such obstacles – including the migration process itself – may be detrimental to the health of Mexican immigrants, especially those who have recently moved.

A study led by Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs finds that Mexican immigrants who relocate to the United States are more likely to experience declines in health within a short time period compared with other Mexicans.

You only live once. Carpe diem. You can’t take it with you.
As often as we hear these clichés, they might include some real economic wisdom for some, according to research led by Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School. The researchers argue in the Journal of Mathematical Economics that some people might want to spend more and work less – just in case their time runs out.

You only live once. Carpe diem. You can’t take it with you.

As often as we hear these clichés, they might include some real economic wisdom for some, according to research led by Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School. The researchers argue in the Journal of Mathematical Economics that some people might want to spend more and work less – just in case their time runs out.

Stories about wartime atrocities and torture methods, like waterboarding and beatings, often include justifications – despite whether the rationale is legitimate.  
Now, a study by Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School featured in Psychological Science shows how those justifications actually creep into people’s memories of war, excusing the actions of their side. 

Stories about wartime atrocities and torture methods, like waterboarding and beatings, often include justifications – despite whether the rationale is legitimate.  

Now, a study by Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School featured in Psychological Science shows how those justifications actually creep into people’s memories of war, excusing the actions of their side

For his undergraduate senior thesis, Taylor Francis, a major in the Woodrow Wilson School and former intern at Coursera, Square and Facebook, wanted to apply his interests in the tech world to important policy issues.
His experience at Coursera showed him that the traditional higher education model — courses in a structured program that lead to a formal degree and eventually a job in that field — is being challenged by recent educational innovations.

For his undergraduate senior thesis, Taylor Francis, a major in the Woodrow Wilson School and former intern at Coursera, Square and Facebook, wanted to apply his interests in the tech world to important policy issues.

His experience at Coursera showed him that the traditional higher education model — courses in a structured program that lead to a formal degree and eventually a job in that field — is being challenged by recent educational innovations.

The Supreme Court upheld Michigan’s voter-approved affirmative action ban April 22, 2014, prohibiting using race as a factor in admission to state universities. But the decision was a splintered one, showcasing five different opinions from the Supreme Court. Now, experts are starting to wonder: Will this ruling hasten the trend of ending racial preferences in college admissions around the country? And what does it mean legally? 
We sat down with Paul Frymer, associate professor of politics and acting director of the Program in Law and Public Affairs (LAPA) at WWS, to discuss the decision, its impact and possible repercussions.

The Supreme Court upheld Michigan’s voter-approved affirmative action ban April 22, 2014, prohibiting using race as a factor in admission to state universities. But the decision was a splintered one, showcasing five different opinions from the Supreme Court. Now, experts are starting to wonder: Will this ruling hasten the trend of ending racial preferences in college admissions around the country? And what does it mean legally? 

We sat down with Paul Frymer, associate professor of politics and acting director of the Program in Law and Public Affairs (LAPA) at WWS, to discuss the decision, its impact and possible repercussions.